Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme

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Archive for the category “poetry”

Poetry Friday: “Steam Train”

There was a time when I used to wait for inspiration to strike.  Then I decided I needed to challenge myself to become a professional writer of poetry and create my own inspiration. (Or, at the very least, seize upon any and every opportunity to be inspired)

poetryfridaybutton-fulllCase in point: Last week, writer and blogger Michelle H. Barnes featured writer/poet/editor/blogger/chocolatier Renee LaTulippe sharing one of her lyrical language lab’s lessons: sentence transformation via mood, effect, and emotion. In this series of posts, Renee encourages prose writers (and poets, as well) to improve their writing using poetic devices and techniques.

In her post, Renee used a sentence about a steam train as an example, and showed how to progressively develop the sentence into something more than “just” a sentence. As I read her suggestions and sentences – and thought about each of the photos she shared – the following four lines came to me. It’s another short poem like the one I shared last Friday, but between electrical wiring issues, a blown boiler, and a father who is in the hospital, life is still pretty nuts around here; fortunately for me, four lines was all the poem requested. Hope you like it…and be sure to visit Becky Shillington’s blog for today’s Poetry Friday Roundup!

Steam Train

Firebox flares,
steam shoots high;
smoky billows
shake the sky.

- © 2014, Matt Forrest Esenwine

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: “Good night”

It’s been a crazy week around here. We lost power and water on Sunday, and although we have both of them finally back as of today, we’re still without heat. Fortunately, we rely on the wood stove more than the oil furnace, so we’re doing ok.

Poetry_Friday logoThe reason I bring this up is because I’ve barely had any time – or even ability – to get any work done this week, let alone write. But as a writer, I’m always ‘working’, so I wanted to share this short little vignette which I wrote while thinking about the snow that was in the forecast for last night. As always, I hope you enjoy it…and be sure to visit Keri at Keri Recommends for today’s Poetry Friday celebration and a touching tribute to her dad from Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Good night

Like Mother’s whisper,
soft and low –
the gentle touch
of Autumn snow.

- © 2014, Matt Forrest Esenwine

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: “Revenge”

Poetry_Friday logoI don’t think I’ve ever used the word “spree” before in my life.

Why is this worth mentioning? Because “spree” was the Word of the Month over at poet/author David L. Harrison’s blog this past October.

I enjoy challenges, but have not been able to participate in the “WOM” for the past several months due to my hectic schedule. But since October marked the 5th anniversary of the “WOM” challenge, I really wanted to write something to share.

As it turned out, I didn’t get the poem completed until October 30 – which meant it only stayed posted for a couple of days before it disappeared to make room for the November Word of the Month, “brew!” So in order to keep the poem alive a little longer, I thought I’d share it here.

But be forewarned:  while most of the WOM poems are fun, children’s poems, this is…not. But I hope you like it! And for all of today’s Poetry Friday links – along with a perfect November poem by John Freeman – please visit Diane Mayr at Random Noodling!

Revenge

I hadn’t seen the hornet, hiding
under the lip
of our watering can. Unaware, I was,
of paper wasps waiting
for someone like me
to open that old, weathered shed door
behind the woodpile.
Shaken, stung, yet
resolute and undaunted, I
set about to exact
vengeance.

Armed with hubris
and two giant cans of propellant-poison,
my killing spree began
under eaves,
behind shutters, beneath deck
and stairs – my hands
like machines, I
spared no mercy
on every wood-pulp nest,
every mud-dauber domicile,
every honeycombed bell
brimming with yellow-striped clappers
ready to ring.
.
I must have slain hundreds –
laying waste to their homes and families
in liquid immolation
to save my own
from the threat of pain
and fear
and anaphylaxis.
Proud Conqueror of Nature, I
smiled in satisfaction
when, turning to the back door,
one lone, weary hornet –
in a feeble attempt to fly,
only half-alive
but with double the fury –
came out from that old woodpile
and in an instant
was barely more than an arm’s length
from my face.

With one last drop of death
remaining, I finished off
the final can, spraying furiously, franticly
determined
to not let this lowliest of creatures
have the better of me.
I no sooner heard the hollow sound
of air discharging from the muzzle
when I felt a bullet – hard and organic –
slam into my temple
with a ferocious heat.
Brushing the enemy away, I
watched a spent casing
fall to the lawn,
destined for compost.

I stepped forward
and faltering, fell to one knee, ignorant
of my circumstance
as my vision became blurred,
my muscles, weak;
breathing, labored.
Sinking to the grass, I
wished I could call out
to my wife,
my son,
someone, anyone,
but all I could do
was watch my world darken
while beside me,
the wing of one lone, weary hornet
twitched.

- © 2014, Matt Forrest Esenwine

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: “Standards” – and more zenos!

poetryfridaybutton-fulllI have to thank authors/poets Michelle H. Barnes and J. Patrick Lewis for introducing me to the zeno, a short, fun poetic form Pat came up with a few years ago.

Michelle shared a couple of Pat’s zenos on her blog earlier this month and I went on a zeno-writing spree that had me writing a couple each week! (You can read about what they are and see one of mine HERE)

Today, Michelle is featuring all the zenos she has received at her blog as part of the wrap-up to her “Ditty of the Month” challenge. Hopefully, you’ll also enjoy this new one I wrote specifically for today! And for all of today’s ghoulish Poetry Friday links, Linda Baie is hosting the festivities at Teacher Dance!

Standards

When I go trick-or-treating, I’m
not that picky –
not at
all! –
but I may break
down and
bawl
with a stinkin’
popcorn
ball.

- © 2014, Matt Forrest Esenwine

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

 

Poetry Friday: “Which One?”

poetryfridaybutton-fulllToday I thought I’d reach back into the archives and pull out something from 2001, which I wrote when I was first starting to write for children. Ironically, it’s not so much a “children’s poem” as it is a little light verse for parents…but I hope you enjoy it, nonetheless! For all of today’s Poetry Friday links, head on over to Cathy Mere’s Merely Day by Day!

Which One?

This morning one jumped on my bed,
The other broke a plate;
They both demanded breakfast, but
They didn’t want to wait.

I cleaned the mess and poured some milk,
And as I turned around
I heard the kitchen garbage can
Go crashing to the ground.

Just then I saw bright orange paint
Upon the bedroom door,
And half a roll of toilet paper
On the bathroom floor.

The first one took off running and
The second did the same,
But neither one would answer when
I called them both by name.

It looks like one got into mud,
The other played with water;
I don’t know which I ought to chase:
The kitten, or the daughter!

- © 2001, Matt Forrest Esenwine

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

 

Poetry Friday: “Jack’s Lament”

poetryfridaybutton-fulllI admit it, I’ve been on a zeno binge.

The zeno is a new poetic form created by former U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis, and if you have not heard about it, you can find all the details about how it was created at poet/author Michelle H. Barnes’ blog – in fact, she’s hosting Poetry Friday today!

You can see the zeno I wrote for last week’s Poetry Friday post HERE. As for today’s offering…

Jacks Lament (image)

(click to enlarge)

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: “First Call”

Wouldn’t you know it…J. Patrick Lewis had to go an invent another new poetic form that’s so addictive, you can’t leave it alone.poetryfridaybutton-fulll

Last Thursday, writer Michelle H. Barnes featured Pat on her blog (you can read the entire post HERE) and following the interview, she asked him to share a poetic challenge for her readers. He suggested writing a “zeno” – a poem based on the syllabic structure of a hailstone sequence, a series of numbers that rises and falls like hailstones in a cloud – and has baffled mathematicians for centuries.

I’ll save you the academics of how hailstone sequences are created…but to put it simply, one can take any number at all, do a couple of simple calculations, and the series of numbers that results from these calculations always, always, always ends in 8,4,2,1,4,2,1,4,2,1. (And the crazy thing is, no one knows why!) So a zeno poem would have 8 syllables in the first line, 4 syllables in the 2nd line, 2 in the 3rd line, and so on.

For someone who enjoys wordplay, challenges like this are poetic crack.

I wrote a couple and am still working on a few more. Many thanks to Michelle for sharing one of mine this past Monday - and thanks a LOT to Pat for suggesting this form. (and yes, Pat, I’m saying that honestly AND sarcastically!) Michelle has been sharing zenos from other readers all week at her blog, if you’d like to read more. Here’s my latest:

First Call

Books and bags unpacked, the act is
that he’s glad he’s
on his
own,
a young boy’s life
long out-
grown
until he hangs
up the
phone.

- © 2014, Matt Forrest Esenwine

For more poetry, fun and links, please visit Tricia Stohr-Hunt, who is hosting Poetry Friday at The Miss Rumphius Effect! And be sure to get your CYBILS Awards nominations in soon – you only have a few days left!

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Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: “Coming to Terms,” CYBILS Awards, and a Wandering Wildebeest

poetryfridaybutton-fulllJama Rattigan is hosting Poetry Friday today, and if anyone knows how to create a crowd using food, it’s Jama! She has croissants and chocolate and candied rose petals and raspberry-litchi pate and…well, you’ll just have to stop by and try some.

Anyway, a couple of weeks ago I announced that a new anthology titled, Trigger Warning: Poetry Saved My Life, had just been made available for sale. I was looking forward to seeing it because I was one of the folks whose poetry had been selected for inclusion…and today, I’ll be sharing that poem here!

More on that in just a little bit…

First, I need to let you know the 9th Annual CYBILS Awards nominations are now OPEN!

Cybils-Logo-2014-Rnd2The CYBILS, as they are called, are the Children’s and Young Adult Bloggers’ Literary Awards, and are announced in February of each year. Two rounds of judges will narrow down all the nominated books for a variety of categories, and will decide which they feel are the best of the best.

But before they can whittle down the list…they need a list! That’s where you come in. Just click visit the CYBILS nominations page and let the judges know which of this year’s books for children and young adults you feel deserve some special recognition. As you’ll see, there are lots of categories, from early readers to young adult speculative fiction to my favourite, poetry!

(We already have some FANTASTIC poetry collections, too – which is going to make this even harder then normal!)

So make sure you log on and get your favourite book nominated - and I’ll keep you posted here about what’s happening!

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WildebeestSpeaking of poetry collections, I just received my copy of Irene Latham’s Dear Wandering Wildebeest: And Other Poems from the Watering Hole yesterday, and it’s as wonderful as I had suspected. Many thanks to Irene as well as to last year’s CYBILS Poetry Award winner, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater for sending it to me – I was lucky enough to be the winner of a giveaway Amy hosted, and I read the book as soon as I opened up the box!

The book contains 15 poems of varying styles – some rhyming, some free verse, some light-hearted, some more serious – all about the various creatures that come to visit a watering hole on the African grasslands. Irene spotlights meerkats, rhinos, lionesses, and black mambas, to name a few, but I think my two favourites are the ones Irene opens and closes with, “To All the Beasts Who Enter Here” and “Says Nightjar to the Stars,” respectively.

Anna Wadham’s illustrations perfectly complement the playful, spontaneous, and stoic nature of the beasts, too – and of Irene’s text. If you haven’t considered picking this up yet, I recommend you do!

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Now, then…to my poem! I have to thank award-winning slam poet Zachary Kluckman, the anthologist of Trigger Warning: Poetry Saved My Life, for selecting this poem for inclusion.  When I first read what type of book he was putting together and the subject matter – literally, how poetry can save someone’s life – I knew exactly what I was going to write about.

trigger-warningAbout 25 years ago, a very close friend of mine went through an extremely difficult time in his life…and it nearly destroyed him. Fortunately, he found support from his friends and therapy from writing poetry. I hope you like it.  I’ve posted audio of my reading of the poem below (sorry about the big head – I can’t do anything about it!) and of course, if you’d like to read more about how poetry can save lives, be sure to pick up a copy of the book, on sale now!

Coming to Terms

He had to keep quiet.

No one could know of his love, no –
infatuation – for the tall, dark beauty
with whom he shared daily smiles. His thoughts
were his, yet quickly
he became their slave; not uncommon,
of course, as we all succumb
to that numbness, once, at least,
but for his own sake

he had to keep quiet.
None could know, not even
Dark Beauty, who
had no inkling of an unthinkable
courtship, but simply smiled back
as acquaintances do
until one day, in a burst of emotion and discovery,
every passionate detail of his desire
came pouring forth from every pore
in an unintended self-immolation of love and pain.

The revelation
and cloud of rejection suffocated
and he wished it would
deaden the nerves that allowed him to feel
every word hurled
from Dark Beauty, friends,
parents, the world.
Endless days spent scared and crying
bled into pill-filled nights
that led not to quiet slumber but to weeks
and months
in the ward, safe and distressed. Alone

in his room, with pen
firm between heart and forefinger, line
by line he began to sort through love,
loss, dejection,
reflection
and the realization
he had been lying to himself, thinking

he had to keep quiet.

© Matt Forrest Esenwine, from Trigger Warning: Poetry Saved My Life (Swimming with Elephants Publications, 2014)

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Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!

PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: The 2014 CYBILS & Shel Silverstein

Cybils-Logo-2014I’m not sharing an original poem of mine today, because I’m letting a master of wit and humour take the spotlight in honour of the anniversary of his birth. More on that in just a few…

Before I do anything, I need to express my heartfelt gratitude to the folks at the CYBILS Awards for selecting me as a 2nd-round judge for the poetry competition once again. My first year participating in the CYBILS was last year, and it was so much fun (albeit a lot of work), I hoped I would be able to take part a second time…and I am!

The 1st-round judges will review all the books that have been submitted and whittle the list of nominees down to 6 or 7; the 2nd-round judges will then debate the merits of each of these 6 or 7 books to determine the winner. One day in the future, I will not be allowed to be a judge because one of my books will be short-listed. (That’s the plan, anyway) Until then, I’m happy to peruse the books that are up for the award.

To nominate a book – for any category – just log onto the CYBILS webpage between Oct. 1 – 15! Winners will be announced early next year. For now, here’s a list of my fellow poetry judges. Their names are followed by the name of their blogs and their Twitter handles:

First Round:
  .
Kelly Fineman
Writing and Rumination
@kellyfineman
 .
Nancy Bo Flood
The Pirate Tree
  .
Jone Rush MacCulloch
Check It Out
@JoneMac53
  .
@MargaretGSimon
  .
Tricia Stohr-Hunt
The Miss Rumphius Effect
@missrumphius
  .
Sylvia Vardell
Poetry For Children
@SylviaVardell
  .
@BridgetRWilson
  .
        .           
Round Two:
  .
Linda Baie
Teacher Dance
@LBaie
   .
Renee La Tulippe
No Water River
@ReneeMLaTulippe
  .
@terseverser
  .
Laura Shovan
Author Amok
@laurashovan
  .
Matt Forrest Esenwine
Radio, Rhythm, and Rhyme
@MattForrestVW
  .
For a list of all the judges of all the categories, click HERE!
 
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shel-silverstein

Click to read more of Silverstein’s poetry.

Now, then…it’s time I wished the late, great Shel Silverstein a Happy Birthday! Born on September 25, 1930 in Chicago, Illinois, “Uncle Shelby” would have been 84 years old this week.

Of course, he is remembered by most folks for his classic children’s books like Where the Sidewalk Ends (celebrating its 40th birthday this year), A Light in the Attic, and The Giving Tree (which celebrates its 50th birthday this year). He is also remembered as a cartoonist for “Playboy” magazine. But many folks do NOT know:
  • Shel was a fan of country music and wrote numerous hit songs, including Johnny Cash’s “Boy Named Sue,” Loretta Lynn’s “One’s on the Way” and “Hey Loretta,” Bobby Bare’s “Pour Me Another Tequila, Sheila,” Dr. Hook’s “Cover of the Rolling Stone” and “Queen of the Silver Dollar,” and the Irish Rovers’ classic, “The Unicorn.”
  • In the 1950s, he was stationed in the Army overseas, which is where he first started developing his knack for cartooning.
  • He was a playwright and collaborated with the great David Mamet on more than one occasion.
  • He decided to shave his head bald when he began feeling self-conscious about losing his hair.
  • He was a compulsive writer, and would often jot ideas or sketches down on whatever was available, including his clothes or skin!

I see lists of the best, greatest, most memorable Silverstein poems all the time, but my favourite is often not on those lists for some reason. It’s “The Little Boy and the Old Man,” a short but touching poem, and you can read  it HERE.

So Happy Birthday, Uncle Shelby! For more Poetry Friday fun and links, please visit our friend, Laura Purdie Salas’s blog, Writing the World for Kids, and I’ll close this post with a rare performance – Shel Silverstein singing live on The Johnny Cash Show!
.

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poetryfridaybutton-fulllDid you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: New adult anthology!

trigger-warningTrigger Warning: Poetry Saved My Life is a poetry collection compiled and edited by performance poet Zachary Kluckman of Albuquerque, NM, the 2014 National Poetry Awards Slam Artist of the Year. I’m very pleased and honored to have a poem included in it – and I just received word that the book is available for purchase!

As soon as I learned about the book, I knew I wanted to submit a poem and I knew exactly the story I was going to tell – a true story about a close friend of mine whose life was, indeed, saved by poetry. I hope you like it, and all the other stories, scenes, and vignettes pulled together from all walks of life into this one, single-minded anthology of common ground.

The book is described by the publisher thusly: “Here are the sounds of pleasure heralded against shoulders, the uplifted voices and stark tremolos of those who have survived the turmoil and trembling because they found something so deceptively simple – so heart-wrenchingly real”…as poetry. Click on the link for more info, or click HERE to purchase it!

And for all of today’s Poetry Friday links, info, and fun, head on over to The Poem Farm with Amy Ludwig VanDerwater!

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poetryfridaybutton-fulllDid you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!

PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

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