Poetry Friday: some hard acts to follow…

If you’ve been following Poetry at Play (the website/blog for Poetry Advocates for Children & Young Adults), you’ve recently had the opportunity to read some remarkable poetry from some of the luminaries in the world of children’s literature.

Poet, author, and film producer Steven Withrow, who founded PACYA last year, has been featuring a different poet each week.  The series kicked off August 2 with a fantastic new poem, “Instructions Found After the Flood,” by U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis, from the new poetry anthology, The National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry, due out in September.  Jane Yolen followed with a “Summer Sijo,” by which David L. Harrison was then inspired to write “The Acrobat”…and last week, Kate Coombs offered up “Code Name Lizard,” from her book Earth Bones.

So where is this all leading?

Strangely…to me!

I’m still trying to figure out how I ended up being the 5th person in this series – these are, indeed, some very tough acts to follow – but I do hope you like it.  Like last week’s post, this is part of the manuscript for my winter-themed collection, which I’m still working on.  Here’s the link:  http://poetryatplay.org/

And here’s the link for all the other folks who are taking part in Poetry Friday today:  http://poetryforchildren.blogspot.com/

Have a safe and happy Labor Day weekend!

8 thoughts on “Poetry Friday: some hard acts to follow…

  1. Hi, Matt–
    Nice to meet you, and looking forward to reading more. I do love a villanelle, and “Do Not Go Gentle” is one of my favorites, a poem that no amount of high school analysis could ruin for me!

    1. Nice to meet you, as well, Heidi! You bring up a good point – when the poems/stories/books we were forced to dissect beyond the realm of appreciation still hold their charm, you know they’re something special!

  2. Matt — welcome to Poetry Friday! And you came with such fanfare — contrats on being in the lineup at PACYA!! Love reading a poem about winter in the midst of this head and humidity!

  3. Pingback: poemattic

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