Poetry Friday: “Pirate Dreams”

This will be my last blog post of the month, as the family is packing up and heading off to my remote office starting tomorrow:

You can’t see my desk, chair, microphone, or reference books because they’re just out of frame, an hour away.

 

Yes, it’s that time of year again when we head off to York Beach, Maine – just over the border, but a million miles from home. In fact, I wasn’t able to post anything earlier this week because I’ve been so busy trying to get us ready for the trip while wrapping up a big radio commercial project I completed for the New Hampshire Association of Broadcasters and simultaneously writing query letters and a new picture book manuscript.

Believe me, if anyone needs a vacation around here, it’s me!

Cleo - 17 years old
Happy birthday, Cleopatra. You’ve earned your spot on the bed.

But before I get to today’s Poetry Friday offering, first things first: I need to share a photo of the lovely lady about whom I wrote last week. She just turned 17 years old, and I surprised a lot of folks with that last line.

Cleo has enjoyed a long life of mousing, playing, and generally keeping us all in line…and I worry if she’ll make it to 18. If she doesn’t, we’ll probably find her either on the bed or in the bathtub – her two favourite spots. (What is it with cats and bathrooms??)

Now, then, for today’s poem: something I wrote last year, shortly after we got back from our first trip to York Beach. Interestingly, the poem has less to do with York Beach and more to do with my own memories of visiting the local shoreline as a child two or three times each summer.

Pirate Dreams

The first seashell
I ever found
on my own
still whispers to me
when I hold it to my ear.

The pinwheel
Mom bought
at that candy shop
where you could watch them
make salt water taffy
all day, still spins
like a shiny new motor.

And above my head,
atop my bed, The Jolly Roger –
that faded black plastic flag
I won at the arcade
down by the boardwalk –
flies proudly.

…….It’s been a long time
…….since we’ve been to the beach,
…….but Dad says
…….this year might be the year.

…….Already
…….I can taste the salty air,
…….smell seaweed drying
…….under hazy sun,
…….and feel hot sand
.. ….slipping between toes.

Until then,
I’ll let my seashell –
the first one I ever found
on my own –
lull me to sleep
while my pinwheel motor
spins and spins
with The Jolly Roger
flying high.

© 2014, Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

poetryfridaybutton-fulllYou’ll find all of today’s Poetry Friday links at A Year of Reading, so be sure to check out Mary Lee’s review of a new farm animal picture book, along with lots and lots of poetry! Enjoy the rest of your June…I’ll be back on Independence Day Eve, July 3rd!

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Poetry Friday: “On Her 17th Birthday”

poetryfridaybutton-fulllA little poem I wrote last night for a very, very special lady.
.

On Her 17th Birthday

Her youth was spent aloof and free,
the queen of her own destiny.
Now frail and thin, she barely hears –
hasn’t caught a mouse in years.

– © 2015, Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

Jama Rattigan is hosting Poetry Friday today, and you know what that means:  snacks! Well, of course, plenty of poetry links, too – but you can always count on snacks when Jama is blogging, and today she has Blueberry Crumb Bars…so head on over before they’re all gone!

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SCVBWI_Member-badge (5 years)Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
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To keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)
Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

When people stop trying

I’ve been noticing something a lot lately. I’ve been noticing spelling errors made by people who are supposed to know how to spell things. I’ve been reading errors in grammar made by people who are supposed to know how to write.

I’ve been hearing things spoken incorrectly by people who get paid to speak.

Is the world becoming more and more full of folks who just don’t care enough to bother, or am I becoming a curmudgeon?

Thankfully, I’m still an exuberant, virile, young man…so the answer appears to be the former.

Dachshund
Poor little guy had no idea he was going to be the basis for a blog post.

Lack of communication in the communications industry

Seriously – what is going on these days? Everywhere I turn I’m bombarded with mistakes made by precisely those people who should not be making these mistakes.
A few examples:

– A radio news reporter was relating a story on-air about a domestic dispute involving a man, his girlfriend, and his dog. When the woman doing the reporting made reference to the man’s “dash-hound,” I had no clue what she was talking about until it occurred to me she apparently had never heard of a dachshund. Granted, the average American might not recognize that word as being pronounced “DAHK-suhnd,” but one of the first lessons in radio I ever learned 25 years ago was, if you don’t know how to pronounce something – ask!

– A local TV news outlet shared a news story on their Facebook page recently, recognizing the anniversary of the discovery of the bodies of two young girls, whose killer is still unknown. The headline noted that the girls have never been found. Now, not to be insensitive, but if their bodies were discovered some 15 years ago, I’m pretty sure the girls aren’t going to pop up anytime soon. Who writes this stuff??

– The other day, I heard a radio commercial I almost couldn’t stand listening to. The audio was thin and distorted, the person speaking sounded completely unenthused about whatever he was talking about, and I can’t even remember what they were selling because I just kept waiting for it to end. The commercial sounded like it had been recorded over a telephone…because it probably had been.

Make an effort, people!

Granted, you may be prone to a malapropism from time to time. You might use less-than-perfect grammar when leaving a Facebook comment. Heck, even I find spelling mistakes in this blog sometimes months after I’ve posted!  But these are examples of glaring errors made by people paid to not make these mistakes.

The person who didn’t know what a “dash-hound” actually mispronounces words all the time; it became a nearly daily occurrence before I stopped listening altogether.

TV news departments have large staffs of people who are paid good money to communicate the news, so grammar and syntax should not be a problem area.

No radio commercial should ever be recorded over the telephone…ever. Even the ones that are written to sound like they’re telephone conversations should be recorded in-studio. The particular commercial in question is either the result of a lazy producer or a sales rep who was given way too much control over the production process.

Grammar-Yoda

Human error…or something worse?

We all make mistakes. As I said, I understand that. But the preponderance of examples such as these leads me to wonder if something else is going on…something much worse.

In each of the three cases I shared above, a simple solution would have been to take one extra step. The radio reporter could have asked someone how to pronounce this word she’s never seen before. The TV news headline writer could have had someone proofread the post first. And the business owner who recorded the awful commercial could have come in to the studio.

But instead, that one extra step was neglected. It could be called laziness or ineptitude.

I prefer to call it apathy.

…and apathy IS worse

Laziness is a human condition, a state of being. Ineptitude is a lack of skills capable of completing a task.

But apathy is a lack of concern for that which one should have concern! Apathy, as inactive as it may seem, is actually a very active thing. It prevents people from producing good work not because they are lazy, inept, or otherwise incapable. It prevents them from performing because they just don’t care.

So whether it’s your job, your marriage, or any kind of project of which you find yourself involved, don’t be apathetic.

Don’t not care.

And if you recognize that you truly don’t care about the project, step back, step aside, or step down – and let someone who does care do the job.

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This just in: I had not even had a chance to hit “post” when a Facebook friend shared this ridiculous headline about an “amphibious” pitcher!  That’s right…he doesn’t just pitch with both hands, folks, he can live underwater, too! Once again, where’s a proofreader when you need one??

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Poetry Friday: “Early Riser”

poetryfridaybutton-fulllA few weeks ago, poet/author Laura Purdie Salas offered up a photo of a seagull on a statue as a poetry prompt on her “15 Words-or-Less” blog post. I responded with a short free verse poem…and it has been on my mind quite a bit lately.

I’m not sure if it’s because I’ve decided to use it as part of a larger project, if it’s because the family is gearing up for another summer excursion to Maine and I have the Long Sands of York Beach on my brain, or if it’s because I simply like the way it turned out. Probably all three.

So I’ve fleshed it out just a bit and am sharing it with you today! And if you missed it, I’d love for you to check out this past Tuesday’s post about poetry videos and the incredible voiceovers that the poets themselves provided for the videos.

Oh, and since it’s Friday, be sure to visit my friend and fellow Poet’s Garage member Buffy Silverman’s blog for all of today’s Poetry Friday links and hi jinks!

Early riser

Sea mist swirls across the shoreline;
single seagull seizes a current
……..and rides, suspended
in a headwind.

– © 2015, Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

 

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To keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)
Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

The Art of Poetry Voiceovers

If you think you don’t like poetry – hang on a second. I just might change your mind in a few minutes.

ID-10084724 (Mic)Anyone who has read this blog more than once or twice probably knows by now that in addition to being a voice artist, I also write quite a bit of poetry. Most of it is for children, although I do write quite a bit of adult-themed poetry, as well.

So when I was considering what to write about for today’s post, I had the thought that it might be nice to combine the two.

But how to do that? I decided to simply take a moment and share what I think are some really great examples of poetry voiceovers done by non-voiceover professionals – that is, poems read by the poets themselves. And not just “poetry readings,” but true voiceovers, designed for production with video.

There are some truly astounding examples out there of poetry and voice work coming together.

Take, for instance, this short poem by poet/author Freya Manfred, who has written six books of poetry as well as a memoir about her life as the daughter of novelist Frederick Manfred:

She has such a calm, reassuring, knowledgeable-sounding voice…I imagine her narrating the next National Geographic documentary. (and yes, that’s a compliment!)

Then there’s this captivating and moving video by Canadian poet Shane Koyczan, which has garnered more than 16 million views in a little over 2 years:

Prefer something a little more understated? The following poem by Minneapolis poet/lawyer Tim Nolan is a bit more cerebral than the previous two, and features a drier – yet still effective – voiceover:

Finally, I have to share the young-guy-next-door, tell-it-like-it-is style delivery of poet and artist Todd Boss. Like fellow Minnesotan Nolan, Todd is an extremely creative fellow; he not only has two books of poetry out, but also writes poetry on commission and creates ingenious works of poetic art for pubic display. My thanks to friend, poet Steven Withrow, for sharing this video:

In their own ways, each of these folks brings poetry to life in different ways – through their unique words, of course, but also via their unique vocalizations of those words. One stressed word here, an unstressed syllable there, a too-short pause at the wrong moment…could create an entirely different mood, or worse, lose the connection created with the listener.

Professional voice work does, indeed, require an understanding of words, emotions, and sounds…and these poets, although not professional voice actors, obviously have a solid grasp on how best to relate their words from the printed page to a listener’s ear. I hope you enjoyed these, and hope you find others you will love on your own!

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Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
PoetsGarage-badgeTo keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the link up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)  Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!