Poetry Friday: Look at what’s in paperback!

Look at what my 6-year-old just brought home!

ng-nature-paperback

Imagine my surprise a few weeks ago, when my son brought home a stack of Scholastic order forms…and they were selling the paperback version of The National Geographic Book of Nature Poetry (National Geographic Kids, 2015)!

What may be old hat for some writers was an absolute thrill for me – seeing a book I contributed to there, in my son’s catalog! I had to buy a copy, which just arrived a couple of days ago. Here is my poem, along with the one I share the page with, from Charles “Father Goose®” Ghigna (click to enlarge):

© 2015 National Geographic Society, Charles Ghigna, and Matt Forrest Esenwine; all rights reserved.
The original hardcover is still available everywhere, of course, so be sure to pick up a copy if you haven’t yet! Also be sure to stop by Carol Varsalona’s Beyond LiteracyLink, for today’s complete Poetry Friday roundup!
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Poetry Friday: “A Father’s Advice”

I was sifting through a number of my older children’s poems the other day, and I re-discovered this little thing. It’s a short poem I wrote at least 6 years ago, that I never poetryfridaybutton-fullldid anything with – possibly because I only wrote it for my kids (it’s based on a saying I used to tell them when they’d get hurt), but more likely because it’s probably not up to ‘publishable’-level quality.

Oh, well. I have so many projects I’m trying to find time to work on these days, I’m sure this poem will never be revised – so I figured I’d share it with you! Even though I wrote it before I found my children’s poetry voice, I still kind of like it…hope you do, too:

A Father’s Advice 

One day, you just might hurt yourself;
you may fall down and skin your knee
or bump your head, or need some help.
Well, please take this advice from me:

The first thing you should always do
is try your best to grin a grin;
‘cause if you find you’re still alive,
it’s not as bad
as it could’ve been.

– © 2011 Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

Violet Nesdoly is hosting Poetry Friday today, so be sure to stop by and check out all the links!

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Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
SCVBWI_Member-badge (5 years)
To keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)
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Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: Cloud Streets haiku

clouds-streets-graphic
(click to enlarge)

I snapped this photo a couple of weeks ago at a local grocery store parking lot. The clouds looked like they were radiating from a central point, which I thought was rather intriguing…and the more I looked at this picture, the more I wondered what caused this formation.

My best guess was that they were a type of stratocumulus cloud, striated due to the particular airflow. My vantage point in this photo was looking at them from the end, which caused them to appear to radiate from the horizon, but in actuality, the clouds were most likely lined up in a normal striated pattern. So the remarkable thing about the photo was not necessarily the clouds themselves, but the angle from which I was able to view them.

Fortunately for me, through a friend of a friend, our local TV meteorologist, Josh Judge, provided a much more scientific – and succinct – explanation:

“They are called, “cloud streets” (also known as horizontal convective rolls). They are created when rising and sinking of warm and cool air creates gaps between cumulus clouds. Then when that rising and sinking of air aligns with the wind, cloud streets are formed.”

Well now, for someone fairly ignorant about meteorology, I was pretty close to correct, wouldn’t you say? Thanks, Josh! And thank you all for stopping by here today! For more poetry, head on over to Keri Recommends, where Keri Collins Lewis (of Winter Swap Poetry fame!) is hosting Poetry Friday!

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poetryfridaybutton-fulllDid you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
SCVBWI_Member-badge (5 years)
To keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)
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Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!

Poetry Friday: “Courtship”

courtship-graphic
(click to enlarge)

That’s a little something I wrote a couple of years ago for Tabatha Yeatts‘ Winter Poetry Swap. I recently tweaked and reformatted it, so I hope you like it! For more poetry, be sure to visit Teacher Dance, where Linda Baie is hosting the first Poetry Friday of 2017!

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poetryfridaybutton-fulllDid you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
SCVBWI_Member-badge (5 years)
To keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)
 .
Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!