Poetry Friday: Look at what’s in paperback!

Look at what my 6-year-old just brought home!

ng-nature-paperback

Imagine my surprise a few weeks ago, when my son brought home a stack of Scholastic order forms…and they were selling the paperback version of The National Geographic Book of Nature Poetry (National Geographic Kids, 2015)!

What may be old hat for some writers was an absolute thrill for me – seeing a book I contributed to there, in my son’s catalog! I had to buy a copy, which just arrived a couple of days ago. Here is my poem, along with the one I share the page with, from Charles “Father Goose®” Ghigna (click to enlarge):

© 2015 National Geographic Society, Charles Ghigna, and Matt Forrest Esenwine; all rights reserved.
The original hardcover is still available everywhere, of course, so be sure to pick up a copy if you haven’t yet! Also be sure to stop by Carol Varsalona’s Beyond LiteracyLink, for today’s complete Poetry Friday roundup!
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Poetry Friday: Cloud Streets haiku

clouds-streets-graphic
(click to enlarge)

I snapped this photo a couple of weeks ago at a local grocery store parking lot. The clouds looked like they were radiating from a central point, which I thought was rather intriguing…and the more I looked at this picture, the more I wondered what caused this formation.

My best guess was that they were a type of stratocumulus cloud, striated due to the particular airflow. My vantage point in this photo was looking at them from the end, which caused them to appear to radiate from the horizon, but in actuality, the clouds were most likely lined up in a normal striated pattern. So the remarkable thing about the photo was not necessarily the clouds themselves, but the angle from which I was able to view them.

Fortunately for me, through a friend of a friend, our local TV meteorologist, Josh Judge, provided a much more scientific – and succinct – explanation:

“They are called, “cloud streets” (also known as horizontal convective rolls). They are created when rising and sinking of warm and cool air creates gaps between cumulus clouds. Then when that rising and sinking of air aligns with the wind, cloud streets are formed.”

Well now, for someone fairly ignorant about meteorology, I was pretty close to correct, wouldn’t you say? Thanks, Josh! And thank you all for stopping by here today! For more poetry, head on over to Keri Recommends, where Keri Collins Lewis (of Winter Swap Poetry fame!) is hosting Poetry Friday!

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Poetry Friday: “Courtship”

courtship-graphic
(click to enlarge)

That’s a little something I wrote a couple of years ago for Tabatha Yeatts‘ Winter Poetry Swap. I recently tweaked and reformatted it, so I hope you like it! For more poetry, be sure to visit Teacher Dance, where Linda Baie is hosting the first Poetry Friday of 2017!

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Poetry Friday: November haiku

Everyone is talking about that big story in the news. You know the one. I’m not sure where this came from, so make of it what you will…

November haiku

Grizzly, wolverine
fight over stag’s warm remains
while the forest burns

– © 2016, Matt Forrest Esenwine, all rights reserved

For today’s complete Poetry Friday roundup, I encourage you to visit the one and only Jama Kim Rattigan at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

And I would be remiss not to thank you, veterans, for all you have done for our country. Here in the U.S., today is Veteran’s Day, and the only reason we were able to hold elections this past Tuesday – and the only reason we can protest, cheer, or write about them – is because of the hard work, dedication, and sacrifices of the men and women of our armed forces. So if you are a veteran…thank you.

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Poetry Friday: “One Minute Till Bedtime” countdown!

One Minute coverAs you may have read in previous posts, I’m thrilled to be a part of Kenn Nesbitt’s new children’s poetry anthology, One Minute Till Bedtime (Little, Brown for Young Readers), which hits bookshelves a mere THREE DAYS from now, this Monday, Nov. 1. (The following week, I’ll be holding a couple of signings at local bookstores in my home state of New Hampshire, so please check out my Facebook page for the Event details!)

The book is comprised of short, 60-second(ish) long poems for kids – and parents, too, of course! – to add some poetry to the end of their day, after the kids have been read to and are tucked in bed. Additionally, the illustrations by New York Times illustrator Christoph Niemann are simultaneously dreamlike yet grounded, whimsical yet introspective.

I’m stunned, honestly, to find myself sharing anthology pages with folks like Kenn, J. Patrick Lewis, Jane Yolen, Lee Bennett Hopkins, Nikki Grimes, Charles Ghigna, David Harrison, Jack Prelutsky, Lemony Snicket, Margarita Engle, Marilyn Singer, and over 100 others. So I hope you enjoy my little contribution:

matt-page
(click to enlarge)

For more poetry links and fun – and a few other samples from inside covers of One Minute Till Bedtime – please visit Linda Baie at Teacher Dance for today’s complete Poetry Friday roundup!

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Revelations from the state fair, Vol. V

hsflogo-lg

Every Labor Day Weekend, I spend Friday through Monday working at the local state fair as the PA announcer, a position that requires not just a lot of talking, but a lot of walking and a whole lot of preparation.

It’s one of the most fun jobs I’ve had in my life, and I look forward to it every year. One minute I’m heading over to one of the small stage areas to double-check times or check out an act I hadn’t seen before; the next, I’m inside the administration building chowing down on a loaded baked potato piled high with every ingredient known to mankind.

(Trust me, when it comes to fair food, one needs to pace oneself.)

As has been tradition here at Triple R, I always share some of the things I’ve learned from each fair, because it’s not just an enjoyable work experience – it’s a learning experience, to boot. In the past, I’ve learned the most despised candies in the universe;  why environmentalists hate truck pulls; and even the best time to “smell” the fair.

So what nuggets of wisdom did I glean this year?

  1. The threat of a hurricane drives up Friday attendance. There was a lot of talk about whether or not Hermine would make it to the New Hampshire coast, and when. We were anticipating getting hit Sunday and Monday, the latter half of the fair, which is why I think our Friday ticket numbers were off the charts. As it turned out, Hermine never even made it, and we had a stupendous weekend all four days!
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  2. sandtasticSand used for sand sculptures is not normal beach sand. As Sandtastic Sand Sculpture Company’s sculptor (pictured) explained to me, the sand they use is comprised of faceted grains, which help the sand to wedge together and stick to itself. Conversely, beach sand is worn smooth from being tossed in the water and therefore is much more difficult to work with.
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  3. Speaking of sculpting…chainsaw sculptors use specially-designed chainsaws. I was chatting with Ben Risney, whose chainsaw
    risney-1
    (Click to enlarge)

    carvings are masterful, when he told me that some of his smaller chainsaws are custom-designed, industrial-grade. His larger saws are standard chainsaws, but the smaller ones, like the one pictured, have an angled bar and run at twice the RPMs of a normal chainsaw. The primary benefit of using a saw with such high RPMs is that the cuts are so smooth, he rarely needs to sand the sculptures once they’re completed! You can see Ben in action and more of his handiwork HERE.
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  4. “Battered Savs??” Who knew? corn-dogs
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  5. Some folks take their fried foods way more seriously than others. I was walking along a pathway when I overheard two young women chatting behind me. The conversation went something like this:
    “So, so sad.”
    “Yes, it is.”
    “Such a sad situation.”
    “Things like that just shouldn’t happen.”
    It was at that moment I realized they were talking about a piece of fried dough that lay on the ground; perfectly elliptical, not one bite had been taken out of it. I shed a tear, as well.
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  6. Saw blades are high-tech pieces of equipment. One of the many attractions at the fair this year were the Axe Women: Loggers of Maine, featuring championship women loggers competing in axe throwing, log rolling, cross-cut sawing, and a number of other events. I learned that their crosscut saw (bottom photo) is made in New Zealand of a special metal alloy that is strong and smooth – but is extremely sensitive to moisture; in fact, if the blade is not kept properly oiled, under very humid conditions it will start rusting within 30 minutes.
    axe-2  axe-1
    axe-3
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  7. Deep-fried pickle chips are superior to deep-fried pickle spears. This is not a decision I came to haphazardly; I spent a number of years researching the merits of each. You’re welcome.
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  8. dino-2 Dinosaur costumes are a lot heavier than they look. Really high-quality costumes, I should say. I had an opportunity to chat with John and Chance Bloom and their family, who run (among other things) a business called Dinosaur Xperience – which brings a walking, talking T-Rex right to your event.
    Chance told me the lifelike suit is 80-100 pounds, and contains a metal cage around the  head and thorax, which allows for

    dino-1
    Yes, even dinos need ID.

    electronically-controlled motion and sound. She can tolerate about 30-40 minutes inside the outfit before she needs to get indoors to cool off and re-hydrate…so thank goodness her husband and their 4 kids are all part of the act, helping her!

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Well, I hope you enjoyed this little review. It’s amazing the things one can learn at the fair – and spending so much time at this one allows me ample opportunity to discover things I might never notice otherwise. And for writers, learning and observing is crucial!

Until next time, have a good week! (and seriously, let me know your thoughts on the deep-fried pickles!)

risney-3
Some examples of Ben Risney’s work, which were featured around the fairgrounds.

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Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
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How I saved a butterfly, told the story in 10 words, and ended up on a blog

Just goes to show, one never knows from whence inspiration might come…

DMC_ColorMichelle H. Barnes over at Today’s Little Ditty is holding her “Ditty of the Month Challenge” writing prompt, and this month’s challenge follows her interview with children’s poet/author Diana Murray. Diana challenged blog readers to write poems based on unlikely heroes, and it took me nearly all month long to discover I was the hero I would eventually write about.

Our family was at a local farm over the weekend, and while inside the gardener’s shed I discovered my subject, having a very difficult time trying to get out of a plastic-sheeted window. When I got home, I wrote a haiku about it -and today, Michelle is featuring it on her blog! I hope you’ll stop by and check out my poem along with all the others…there are some very good poems there, written by many talented folks.

And by the way, I’ll be wrapping up my Throwback Summer series this coming Friday, with another one of my early free verse poems, that I wrote in my college Creative Writing class. It’s verbose and overdone, but not half-bad – so please come back  and let me know what you think!

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Did you like this post? Find something interesting elsewhere in this blog? I really won’t mind at all if you feel compelled to share it with your friends and followers!
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To keep abreast of all my posts, please consider subscribing via the links up there on the right!  (I usually only post twice a week – on Tues. and Fri. – so you won’t be inundated with emails every day)
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Also feel free to visit my voiceover website HERE, and you can also follow me via Twitter FacebookPinterest, and SoundCloud!